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  1. historical-nonfiction:

    Welcome to Derinkuyu, an underground city that once housed up to 20,000 people. In the Cappadocia region, famous for its cave dwellings and underground villages, Derinkuyu stands out for sheer size and complexity. Locals began digging in the 500s BCE. The city consists of over 600 doors, each of which can be closed from the inside. Each floor could be closed off as well. And just to make attacking completely impossible, the entire city was deliberately built without any logic. Its maze-like layout makes navigating the city nightmarish for unfamiliar invaders.

    (Source: whenonearth.net, via gingerhaze)

  2. clickholeofficial:


Busted! A Coworker Who Never Dresses Up Thought He Could Wear Nice Clothes And Not Have Everyone Make A Big Deal Out Of It clickholeofficial:


Busted! A Coworker Who Never Dresses Up Thought He Could Wear Nice Clothes And Not Have Everyone Make A Big Deal Out Of It
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  3. northmiamigoon:

    this is the best post

    (Source: fagshionista, via clearlywrong)

  4. wilwheaton:

    alwaysstarwars:

    The ESB duel and Luke’s recovery - Art by Ralph McQuarrie

    I love this art so much.

  5. dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  
(freakin’ immaculate)
Source with more wonderful photos
dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  
(freakin’ immaculate)
Source with more wonderful photos
    High Resolution

    dreadpiratekhan:


    A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

    Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

    A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

    Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

    Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

    Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

    Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  

    (freakin’ immaculate)

    Source with more wonderful photos

    (via gingerhaze)

  6. comicsalliance:

GIRL FIGHT: THE MARVEL/DC RIVALRY FINALLY EXTENDS TO WINNING THE FEMALE AUDIENCE
By Andrew Wheeler
Marvel launches the eighth of its nine solo titles with a female lead in November with Spider-Woman #1, and the book sadly already has a cloud over it. A variant cover by master erotic artist Milo Manara stirred enough controversy last week to garner mainstream attention. The cover featured Spider-Woman with her apple-shaped butt raised high in decidedly unheroic manner. It was exactly what one would expect from Manara, who’s created a number of superheroine illustrations for Marvel, but the image suggested a particularly overt tone of sexual objectification that could alienate the sort of readers who attended the Women In Marvel panel at San Diego where the series was announced.
As far as I can recall, Marvel has more female solo titles now than ever before, with a ninth title, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, launching in December. On paper, that suggests a laudable effort to reach out to superhero comics’ growing and under-served audience of female readers. Yet the Manara incident serves to remind us that books about women can very easily be targeted to a male audience.
There’s currently an unspoken contest between Marvel and DC to see who can produce more comics aimed at a female audience. It’s possible the contest only exists in my head, as I’ve been keeping a tally of solo titles with female leads for the past several months — but I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that editors at the two publishers have also been keeping track.
READ MORE
comicsalliance:

GIRL FIGHT: THE MARVEL/DC RIVALRY FINALLY EXTENDS TO WINNING THE FEMALE AUDIENCE
By Andrew Wheeler
Marvel launches the eighth of its nine solo titles with a female lead in November with Spider-Woman #1, and the book sadly already has a cloud over it. A variant cover by master erotic artist Milo Manara stirred enough controversy last week to garner mainstream attention. The cover featured Spider-Woman with her apple-shaped butt raised high in decidedly unheroic manner. It was exactly what one would expect from Manara, who’s created a number of superheroine illustrations for Marvel, but the image suggested a particularly overt tone of sexual objectification that could alienate the sort of readers who attended the Women In Marvel panel at San Diego where the series was announced.
As far as I can recall, Marvel has more female solo titles now than ever before, with a ninth title, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, launching in December. On paper, that suggests a laudable effort to reach out to superhero comics’ growing and under-served audience of female readers. Yet the Manara incident serves to remind us that books about women can very easily be targeted to a male audience.
There’s currently an unspoken contest between Marvel and DC to see who can produce more comics aimed at a female audience. It’s possible the contest only exists in my head, as I’ve been keeping a tally of solo titles with female leads for the past several months — but I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that editors at the two publishers have also been keeping track.
READ MORE
    High Resolution

    comicsalliance:

    GIRL FIGHT: THE MARVEL/DC RIVALRY FINALLY EXTENDS TO WINNING THE FEMALE AUDIENCE

    By Andrew Wheeler

    Marvel launches the eighth of its nine solo titles with a female lead in November with Spider-Woman #1, and the book sadly already has a cloud over it. A variant cover by master erotic artist Milo Manara stirred enough controversy last week to garner mainstream attention. The cover featured Spider-Woman with her apple-shaped butt raised high in decidedly unheroic manner. It was exactly what one would expect from Manara, who’s created a number of superheroine illustrations for Marvel, but the image suggested a particularly overt tone of sexual objectification that could alienate the sort of readers who attended the Women In Marvel panel at San Diego where the series was announced.

    As far as I can recall, Marvel has more female solo titles now than ever before, with a ninth title, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, launching in December. On paper, that suggests a laudable effort to reach out to superhero comics’ growing and under-served audience of female readers. Yet the Manara incident serves to remind us that books about women can very easily be targeted to a male audience.

    There’s currently an unspoken contest between Marvel and DC to see who can produce more comics aimed at a female audience. It’s possible the contest only exists in my head, as I’ve been keeping a tally of solo titles with female leads for the past several months — but I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that editors at the two publishers have also been keeping track.

    READ MORE

    (via kateordie)

  7. "Lisa’s role on The Simpsons is a natural fit for episodes where the writers want to ground the show in emotional reality. For some, that makes her something of a killjoy, a too-rational counterpoint to Springfield’s broader comic insanity. And in 25 years, she, like every other member of the family, has certainly seen those qualities exaggerated in unflattering ways. But there’s a reason why Lisa is at the center of some of the show’s most affecting episodes (especially with Yeardley Smith as her voice)—of all the myriad residents of Springfield, Lisa is the most alone.
     
    Sure, her family loves her—in their way—but her intelligence sets her apart, even as the little girl in her wants nothing more than to be one of the crowd. Lisa appeals to every viewer who looks at the craziness and boorishness of a loud, dumb world and longs to both transcend it and be embraced by it. And since Springfield is our world, only exponentially crazier and more boorish, Lisa’s isolation is even more profound"

  8. loish:

my latest illustration! an ode to my troubled love/hate relationship with clutter. loish:

my latest illustration! an ode to my troubled love/hate relationship with clutter.
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    loish:

    my latest illustration! an ode to my troubled love/hate relationship with clutter.

  9. oatmeal:

Read more comics here.
oatmeal:

Read more comics here.
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    oatmeal:

    Read more comics here.

  10. 
Fritz Hegenbart

Fritz Hegenbart
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    Fritz Hegenbart

    (Source: ghostsofthewoods, via actuallygrimes)

  11. mattforsythe:

relationships. mattforsythe:

relationships.
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    mattforsythe:

    relationships.

  12. babylonfalling:

photos: nathan wolkovitz babylonfalling:

photos: nathan wolkovitz
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    babylonfalling:

    photos: nathan wolkovitz

  13. fuckyeahvintageillustration:

    'Dornröschen / Sleeping Beauty' by the brothers Grimm, illustrated by Julius Diez. Published 1904 by Scholz Künstler-Bilderbücher, Mainz.

    Source

    (via fuckyeahvintageillustration)